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ENERGY NEWS

Bangladesh's largest solar power facility Teesta Solar Ltd has transmitted around 443.8 million units of electricity to the national grid in the past 15 months. Unlike conventional power plants that rely on gas, coal, or fossil fuels, the plant generates electricity without requiring fuel or incurring raw material costs -- a capability it is expected to maintain until 2043.
Bangladesh's largest solar power facility Teesta Solar Ltd has transmitted around 443.8 million units of electricity to the national grid in the past 15 months. Unlike conventional power plants that rely on gas, coal, or fossil fuels, the plant generates electricity without requiring fuel or incurring raw material costs -- a capability it is expected to maintain until 2043.
"Bangladesh may opt for gas-fired peaking plants instead of only base-load plants to accommodate more renewable energy. It may seek to limit the LNG demand growth rate by frontloading energy efficiency in industrial processes and captive generation," said the IEEFA.
The Power Division is gearing up implementation of 125 green energy projects as it pursues a goal to meet 10% of the country's power needs from renewables by 2025. The generation capacity of these projects will be 12,047 megawatts, more than the country's present demand in winter and 70% of summer time consumption, according to Power Division officials.
“Under this agreement, Bangladesh will get financing support from next July to June (2025),” Bangladesh Petroleum Corp. operations director, Kazi Muhammad Mozammel Huq, told Arab News. “We’ll mostly import crude oil with the financing of ITFC. In addition, a little portion of refined oil will be imported.”
The Bangladesh government recently increased power tariffs for all consumer categories due to the upheavals caused by a significant gap between power generation costs and corresponding revenue. While inflationary pressures will likely remain high in the wake of electricity and gas price hikes, different energy consumers will now find clean energy investment more compelling.
Shafiqul Alam, Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis’ Lead Analyst for Bangladesh, pointed out the the critical issue of information asymmetry within the sector, which leaves potential adopters—building owners and EPC (Engineering, Procurement, and Construction) companies—unaware of the full benefits and changing regulations related to rooftop solar energy.